I don’t have to ask you if you’ve been through the pain of heartbreak to know that you have. I can see it in your eyes, on your skin, and the way that you undress your body in front of me life I have a sign that reads 1 out of 10. I know it’s hard to trust someone new when someone who once felt so familiar left you in the past along with your love. I could promise you that it won’t be the same. That I am not like any lover you’ve had before because I know what I want. But you’ll never really believe me even when you say you do because you’ve held that promise in your hands before and in the end you were only left with empty words and an empty heart. But I will stay, and I hope that my continuing presence is one that will restore your thoughts when it comes to opening yourself up to someone who really does mean it when they say that they promise.

"I stick to my promises, I promise you," - Colleen Brown (via mostlyfiction)

zooophagous:

prokopetz:

skittles-n-gravy:

perpetual-galaxies:

Jack is hardcore as fuck

scare me like one of your french girls

For money money, the most interesting thing about this confrontation is how completely it inverts the final scenes of a typical Disney film. In most cases, the hero is physically and/or supernaturally outmatched, and triumphs through determination and ingenuity; here, the villain spends the the whole fight running scared, while the protagonist casually no-sells everything that’s thrown at him. And there’s no ironic Disney Death keeping the protagonist’s hands clean, either. Jack just straight-up murders Oogie with malice aforethought while Oogie is running away - and by having Santa Claus himself strike the final blow, the film legitimises Jack’s killing of Oogie as the morally correct course of action.

You don’t fuck around with the motherfucking pumpkin king

zooophagous:

prokopetz:

skittles-n-gravy:

perpetual-galaxies:

Jack is hardcore as fuck

scare me like one of your french girls

For money money, the most interesting thing about this confrontation is how completely it inverts the final scenes of a typical Disney film. In most cases, the hero is physically and/or supernaturally outmatched, and triumphs through determination and ingenuity; here, the villain spends the the whole fight running scared, while the protagonist casually no-sells everything that’s thrown at him. And there’s no ironic Disney Death keeping the protagonist’s hands clean, either. Jack just straight-up murders Oogie with malice aforethought while Oogie is running away - and by having Santa Claus himself strike the final blow, the film legitimises Jack’s killing of Oogie as the morally correct course of action.

You don’t fuck around with the motherfucking pumpkin king

(via reallamefriends)